Behind the scenes and watch me edit Roses

 

In this video, I’m going to take you behind the scenes of this photo and show you my set up and talk about it and the lighting. I was shooting with my Lensbaby Velvet 56 lens on this collection at about an f4 to f5.6. I’ve tried to keep my ISO pretty low – so I was shooting most of these below 400 ISO

I’m using the Seasons Fall Winter preset collection on the photo and texture from the Bella set if you want to check those out.

I’m trying to be creative every single day right now. We are in isolation from the coronavirus and I am making do with the things I can find in my house and just outside. This week I also ordered a bouquet of flowers from Farmgirl Flowers since they are a small boutique online flower service and got the most beautiful bouquet of flowers to play with which is where these roses came from for this setup.

I hope you enjoy this look at my setup and the processing of the final image.

20 Comments

  1. Wendi Donaldson

    Thank you for this great tutorial, Denise! You really helped explain the dodging/burning with the rasterized layer to me.
    The image is really lovely!
    Cheers,
    Wendi

    Reply
    • Denise Love

      So glad you loved it! Thank you! 🙂

      Reply
  2. Carol Wehner

    I loved seeing this video. Thanks, Denise! One question… when I was taught about using the high pass filter, I was told to watch carefully at how many pixels to sharpen. It was described to us that you only want to sharpen to the point of seeing the object edges on the screen. If you go higher, the photo looks fake. Example: the highest pixels I would use would be about 3 or 4. I was blown away when you went to 12! Am I correct (in guessing) that part of why you went high on the photo is because there’s a lot of depth to the subject rose? Thanks for the help.

    Reply
    • Denise Love

      So glad you are enjoying these! I’ve always set my high pass filter at 12 since you can lower the opacity of the layer to bring the strength down. You just lower to the point you like and it is rare that that setting under does it so you don’t have to keep redoing it til you get it where you want it. I haven’t printed anything that looked fake using those setting and adjusting layer opacity. 🙂

      Reply
  3. Kim

    Your “Watch me edit” videos are so helpful – thank you, Denise! Could you please explain rasterizing and also why you chose to use a gray color layer to your image prior to the dodging and burning? I wish you would create a Photoshop workshop. So much Photoshop training is for graphic designers or landscape photographers. I’ve found very little comprehensive training for still life or floral photography.

    Reply
    • Denise Love

      So glad they are helpful! When you rasterize the layer – you are basically flattening it so you can do other things to it like dodge and burn on that layer. Otherwise, it remains a changeable layer for color but you can do nothing to it. I choose a gray layer because it makes no changes to the photo when you select the right shade of gray. Then you can dodge and burn on it creating the light and dark pops. You can dodge and burn on the photo layer too – but sometimes that changes the color too much and I prefer the cleaner light and dark that the gray layer does. (I’ll consider a photoshop class 🙂 )

      Reply
      • Kim

        Thank you. What is the gray that you recommend? Can you add to your post? Key information! You are an outstanding teacher. I’ve watched a LOT of YouTube over the past three weeks or so.

        Reply
        • Denise Love

          Thank you!! Really makes my day 🙂
          I believe that gray ways #7f7f7f – which seems to be the gray that is midway up on the gray tones.

          Reply
  4. Niru karia

    Thank you sooo much Denise. You have explain everything so nicely that any one can understand. I loved watching it. Thanks a million.

    Reply
    • Denise Love

      So very glad you loved it! Thank you 🙂

      Reply
  5. Julie Boyle

    Definitely inspiring Denise. Do like that grey dodge and burn technique – will be trying that for sure. Thank you for sharing.

    Reply
    • Denise Love

      So glad you loved that! Thank you! 🙂

      Reply
  6. bsara

    You really are an inspiration and a delight. Thanks.

    Reply
    • Denise Love

      Thank you! That really makes my day 🙂

      Reply
  7. Mike

    Really enjoying your tuition videos Denise and a big thank you for your inspiration ,I’m scoring high points in my local camera club competitions using your textures .

    Reply
    • Denise Love

      So glad they are helpful!! Thank you and congrats on your camera club scores!!! 🙂

      Reply
  8. Cheryl Lopez

    So pretty! So I was wondering, normally I dodge and burn on a 50% grey layer but I don’t rasterize it. What I do is add a new layer, edit>fill 50% grey (blending mode normal, opacity 100%), change the new layer to overlay mode (you can change it to softlight if needed) and dodge and burn on the new layer. Maybe it is a photoshop 2021 update where you don’t need the extra step? Also you know its Photoshop – always another way.

    Reply
    • Denise Love

      Definitely multiple way to do every action in photoshop! 🙂

      Reply
  9. Alison Eng

    Thank you for yet another inspiring tutorial Denise. I’d like to add my voice to the suggestion above for a Photoshop workshop………..which is not to say that I don’t love all your existing work! Thanks so much for wonderful ideas and teaching.

    Reply

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